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Exhibition


Cooperation


Performance


Publication


Project


Convention


Awards and Theses


Fashion Weekend

Cooperation

The Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg invited us to stage a fashion weekend showing designs of our students to coincide with their exhibition “Edward Steichen: In High Fashion.” In his day, Steichen (1879–1973) was the preeminent protrait photographer world wide. His work for the magazines Vogue and Vanity Fair are highlights of 20th Century photography.
The museum wanted to put stellar examples of historical fashion photography side by side with current models by young designers on an plattform of international renown. This pre-sented an opportunity for the University of the Arts to showcase our complete spectrum of creativity in design, art, music and digital media.
The event was part of a series that included shows featuring the designers Hussein Chalayan, Vivienne Westwood and Wolfgang Joop, as well as a show on Young British Fashion Design.
The fashion weekend was staged in the museum´s largest exhibition space. This provided our team with ample space to present two main attractions: a fashion gala by graduates and stu-dents of our university, as well as the “cabinet of wonder.”
The Wolfsburg Museum regards our university as an advanced location for young talents cap-tivated by an exciting combination of liberal arts, design and fashion. According to the Wolfsburg Museum, our university has developed it´s own unique fashion style, that is de-fined by an unpretentious fusion of haute couture and leisure wear.
To realize our ambitious plans for the events in Wolfsburg, 70 students (among a total of 100) travelled from Bremen, together with their professors Dorothea Mink, Kai Lehmann and Ursula Zillig. The heads of our tayloring department Nicola Essig and Brigitte Stadler also came along for the ride, while our colleague Roland Kerstein and his crew installed their “videomoods".
While our delegation split in smaller groups and went right to work, 28 models and their sup-port staff arrived with Dennis Blys, the show producer based in Hamburg. Our DJ Christian Rogge and accordeon player Florian Oberlechner also prepared themselves for their appearances.
Directed by Professor Kai Lehmann, the models presented collections designed by eight graduates and 19 students. Graduate student Jennifer Thiel supported the team by creating the cat walk design, as well as handling organisation and coordination. Some successful graduates of our design classes also came to Wolfsburg to show their latest collections, among them Pe-ter Wiesmann—now with Louis Vuitton in Paris—Arnold Gevers—who´s with Bernhard Willhelm in Paris—and Frauke Buschmeyer, who is currently working at Strenesse.
During dinner everyone admired the fashion performance “Souvenirs from Istanbul,” as well as new shoe designs presented by Julia von Leliwa with dazzling acrobatics. Later “video-moods” and dancing to live music played by the university´s jazz sextet rounded out the night. As a late high light Wolfburg´s mayor Rolf Schnellecke auctioned of fashion items to benefit the Tabaluga foundation for children.
Under the direction of professors Ursula Zillig and Dorothea Mink the cabinet of wonders in-cluded five concepts: “Helga f. Kramer—the new concept store of HfK Bremen” took the cabinet´s center stage. The project created a “temporary sales zone” offering creations by stu-dents from all seminars at the university, including hand made garments, jewelry and ceramics.
The “insulation material mafia” presented their store concept of “organized creativity,” a steadily expanding, experimental platform created by and for students at the Seminar for Inte-grated Design. This experiment has evolved into a steady working group that creates handi-crafts under their motto “items the world doesn´t need but desperately wants!” The group operates “underground,” builts their shop from cardboard boxes only for “exquisite events,” does business and then vanishes again.
While focussing on presentations of fashion, the “gallery for fashion photos” exhibited series of photographs in a variety of styles. The participating students were especially interested in issue of aestheticising bodies, postures and physiognomies.
The “picture cabinett” presented works created by students from the first to the ninth semes-ter. Their “thumbnails,” “micros,” “scribbles” and textile illustrations showcased drawing as a medium that facilitates analogous processes of conceptualization and presentation of clothing, accessoires and interactions between people and rooms.
“Tableaux à la Mode” was the chamber´s photo studio, inviting guests in for a portrait shoot while observing how pictures of the fashion show were taken. This was supposed to create a direct reference to the exhibit on Edward Steichen. The students involved in the “tableaux” operated under a concept they had created themselves: “Meet the audience, explore surprising situations, improvise narratives.”


Die Wunderkammer

Exhibition

Under the direction of professors Ursula Zillig and Dorothea Mink the cabinet of wonders in-cluded five concepts: “Helga f. Kramer—the new concept store of HfK Bremen” took the cabinet´s center stage. The project created a “temporary sales zone” offering creations by stu-dents from all seminars at the university, including hand made garments, jewelry and ceramics.
The “insulation material mafia” presented their store concept of “organized creativity,” a steadily expanding, experimental platform created by and for students at the Seminar for Inte-grated Design. This experiment has evolved into a steady working group that creates handi-crafts under their motto “items the world doesn´t need but desperately wants!” The group operates “underground,” builts their shop from cardboard boxes only for “exquisite events,” does business and then vanishes again.
While focussing on presentations of fashion, the “gallery for fashion photos” exhibited series of photographs in a variety of styles. The participating students were especially interested in issue of aestheticising bodies, postures and physiognomies.
The “picture cabinett” presented works created by students from the first to the ninth semes-ter. Their “thumbnails,” “micros,” “scribbles” and textile illustrations showcased drawing as a medium that facilitates analogous processes of conceptualization and presentation of clothing, accessoires and interactions between people and rooms.
“Tableaux à la Mode” was the chamber´s photo studio, inviting guests in for a portrait shoot while observing how pictures of the fashion show were taken. This was supposed to create a direct reference to the exhibit on Edward Steichen. The students involved in the “tableaux” operated under a concept they had created themselves: “Meet the audience, explore surprising situations, improvise narratives.”